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May 21, 2017

How to Recognize Different Styles of Kitchen Cabinet Fronts

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kitchen cabinet frontsWhen it’s time to update your kitchen, it’s important to be able to recognize the different styles of kitchen cabinet fronts so that you can create a design that will match your kitchen countertops and the rest of the décor that will be installed in the room.  There are several different kitchen cabinet fronts styles that are very common and easy to find.  Each one has its own unique look and will alter the final effect of the room after you’ve finished your remodeling. 

You can either choose the type of kitchen cabinet fronts that you’ve had all along, but in a new or fresher color, for a similar look to what you have now, or you can pick an entirely different one to achieve a whole new result.  Use  the following descriptions to understand how to recognize the various kitchen cabinet fronts styles.

Flat kitchen cabinet fronts

Flat kitchen cabinet fronts are just as they sound.  They are panels without decorative frills or moldings.  Their clear lines make them appear sleek and simple.  This can make them particularly suited to kitchens with a country style, but may also be appealing in modern and contemporary rooms depending on the material and the color chosen.  The most common type of flat kitchen cabinet fronts are made out of particleboard with a veneer, which are inexpensive but are not always the preferred appearance.  Solid wood flat kitchen cabinet fronts are also available, but at a notably higher price. If you feel strongly about solid wood, try to watch for sales to pick up your kitchen cabinet fronts.  Some of the most popular flat front styles are Mission, Quaker, and Shaker.

Raised kitchen cabinet fronts

Raised kitchen cabinet fronts are among the more traditional styles.  They are panels with a curved or arched appearance.  Their added decorative elements makes them a bit more fancy than the flat kitchen cabinet fronts and suit a room with a more traditional style.  They are more readily available in solid wood and can be found at a more reasonable price than flat fronts, though the price range will vary depending on the species of the wood.  Popular types of raised kitchen cabinet fronts include Colonial, Queen Anne, and Continental.

Mitered kitchen cabinet fronts

Mitered kitchen cabinet fronts add a little bit more decorative flair than the previous two.  This is due to the additional dimension provided by the mitered feature on the fronts.  They are based on either a flat or raised door, but have molding around the edges made out of four pieces that join at the corners at 90-degree angles. They have an appearance comparable to that of a picture frame, for a linear yet softened appeal.  It is important to find mitered kitchen cabinet fronts of good quality, if this is your choice, as a poorly assembled piece will often come apart after a short time due to improper fitting.

By understanding how to tell the difference among these three main types of kitchen cabinet fronts style, you’ll be able to better design your home renovation and make sure that the final result is just what you wanted.

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